Cool Festool router techniques you've probably never considered

Monday, February 1, 2010 | Reader Comments | Routers | How-To

Router outrigger support.

Router tricksWe talk a lot about how Festool designs its products to integrate as a system. Well, these two router tips are the result of having components that work as a system. Because it is a system, accessories and tools can be combined in creative ways that most people have never thought about.

First, to give credit where credit's due, a Festool Owners Group member, James Watriss, posted this on the forum last year. The post recently attracted some new interest by members and we thought we would share this with you.

Using the rods supplied with OF 1400 router, you can use the guide rail adapter as a outrigger support. The handle provides a convenient place to apply lateral and vertical pressure while routing. Give it a try!

 

An alternative to the Plexiglas template routing aid.

Router tricksUse rods for the OF 1400 and OF 2200 routers along with two parallel edge guides to create an alternative to the template routing aid (as featured above). Since our routers feature center line marks on the router base, simply scribe a center line on the material and align the center line mark for perfect results. Need additional fence height for more stability? Well, you can replace the fence surfaces on the parallel edge guide with taller material very easily for additional support with the removable screws.

Using the OF 1400 Router and MFS Routing Template For Arc Segments

Saturday, April 4, 2009 | Reader Comments | How-To | Routers

Applications

 

Application Overview

PDF Download MFS Arc Segment Instructions (PDF)

Circular and arc segments can easily be produced using the MFS routing template and either a Festool OF 1400 or OF 2200 router. This example shows how a round counter top can be produced. The original panel is square with initial outer dimensions of 150 x 150 cm.

Applications

Preparation

For an arc segment, there is no direct center point available as there is for a circle. For this reason, the arc segment must be completely marked off to specify the external center point.

  • Mark a center line on the workpiece.
  • Mark an outer radius on the center line and then the inner radius.
  • Now mark off the desired arc lengths by moving from right to left (to the dashed lines).
  • Fit the MFS according to the instructions. In this case, the extension profile MFS VP 2000 is linked with two short MFS VP 200 or VP 400 profiles.
  • Adjust the copying ring holder so that it can move freely along the entire length of the MFS groove. This is important to ensure that the holder can be moved quickly and precisely. Now slide the copying ring holder into a corner, push the MFS profile together and fix it in place using the fixing screw. Finally, move the copying ring holder in the other corner, tighten the fixing screw on the MFS and check the free movement of the copying ring holder.
  • Insert the centring pin into the innermost groove of the MFS VP 2000 and fix it in place.
  • Mark off the 8 mm hole for the centring pin on the center line of the workpiece.
  • Drill an 8 mm hole in the panel (Fig. 528/06).
  • Clamp the bit in the router (at least 2/3 of the shank must be in the clamping collet).
  • Install the copying ring in the router.
  • Set the maximum routing depth and fix it by using the depth stop.

Tip: The contour of the arc segment can be marked off with the aid of the MFS (see image).

Applications

Applications

Setting up the MFS

  • Install the MFS with the centring pin in the hole in the panel.
  • Loosen the copying ring holder, put the router in the copying ring holder and move it to the outer radius marking.
  • Place the cutter on the workpiece surface.
  • Now align the cutting circle to the marking by rotating the cutter by hand. Repeat for the inner radius.
  • Fix the copying ring holder in place by tightening the fastening screw.
  • Attach the extractor unit to the router and secure the extractor hose.

Tip: The workpiece should be supported at 3 or 4 points so that there is no cutting of the MFT itself or the substructure below. This will prevent the workpiece from tipping over on the substructure.

Applications

Procedure

  • Clamp the workpiece to the MFT using the clamps.
  • With the router set at the first routing depth, (for multiplex, max. 5 – 8 mm per pass) plunge cut at the edge of the arc segment.
  • Rout the contour of the arc segment clockwise.
  • Now rout out the arc segment in several steps (more routing depths).
  • After routing the outer radius, as described in "Setting up the MFS", set the inner radius.
  • Rout the inner radius as described.

If it is not possible to rout the segment, part of the arc segment can be sawn with the help of the TS 55 plunge cut saw.

Applications

Applications

Sawing procedure:

  • Align the guide rail to the marking and clamp.
  • Set the TS 55 cutting depth using a depth stop.
  • Set the speed to 6.
  • Saw the arc segment at the marking.
  • Repeat on the other side as described.

Note: When plunge cutting, the saw blade must rest on the workpiece. This helps prevent the risk of kickback.

Applications

 

The Evolution of a Writing Desk

Saturday, November 15, 2008 | Reader Comments | How-To | Reviews | Routers

Charles Wilson

A special thank you to Charles Wilson for sharing his Writing Desk project in this edition of SysNotes. While Charles has a rather innovative use of the Domino as a locking mechanism in his desks, the tools he used most during the construction were the Festool 1400 EQ Router and MFS Multi-Routing Template System.

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Creating Large Mortises with the Festool OF 1400 Router

Saturday, October 4, 2008 | Reader Comments | How-To | Reviews | Routers

Eiji Fuller

"I was recently commissioned to build some entry doors in the same style of a set I had previously built for a different client. The original doors' joinery was traditional mortise and tenon. The mortises were cut using a large plunge router,  edge guide, and a jig that trapped the edge guide's fence. The tenons were cut on the router table. While the outcome was acceptable I wanted a simpler set up this time around. I also had more than double the number of doors to build and in a small shop simplifying things is about all you can do to stay efficient.
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MFK 700 Starter Bit Set

Thursday, May 15, 2008 | Reader Comments | Routers

MFK 700 Starter Set

The MFK 700 Starter Bit Set.

Save $67.50 versus purchasing these components separately. The value-packed starter bit set for the MFK 700 includes four carbide tipped router bits, a Festool Systainer 1 and router bit insert for the systainer. Festool router bits meet the highest standards of manufacturing. Each bit has a maximum collet depth mark and maximum RPM rating inscribed on the shank for convenience.

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A New Approach To Router Collet Design

Sunday, May 4, 2008 | Reader Comments | Festool Facts | Routers

You may not have noticed but the new Festool MFK 700 Trim Router and OF 2200 Router both employ a newly designed collet.

The new design dramatically improves the service life of the collet and protects against the invasion of contaminates such as saw dust, solid surface dust and other abrasive materials that would normally damage the internals of the collet.

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Festool LR 32 Hole Drilling System for Shelf Pins & Hinges

Sunday, May 4, 2008 | Reader Comments | How-To | Routers

Festool LR 32 Video

The Festool LR 32 Hole Drilling System is a quick and easy way to produce European style cabinets and hinges with your Festool OF 1010 or OF 1400 router. Available in two sizes, 42" (491 621) and 95" (491 622), the LR 32 guide rails work in conjunction with the Hole Drilling Set making your ability to produce 32mm offset holes faster than ever imagined.

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Marc Spagnuolo Discusses Routers & Dust Collection

Sunday, May 4, 2008 | Reader Comments | Dust Extractors | How-To | Routers

Marc Discusses Routers & Saw Dust

Watch our newest video as Marc Spagnuolo, host of thewoodwhisperer.com, discusses routers and how to manage the dust they produce. Learn how he spends more time woodworking and less time cleaning up and see the difference between working with and without dust collection.

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